Government of Manitoba Survey
 
Wait Times Reduction Task Force
Emergency Department Practitioner Survey


Your views on how to improve access to emergency department (ED) services for Manitobans are important. Your responses will inform the recommendations of the Wait Times Reduction Task Force Emergency Department Wait Times and Access Improvement Committee. 
 
For this survey, the types of EDs have been defined as follows:

Emergency departments (EDs) across Manitoba provide different levels of service depending on their location and size. In general, there are four types of EDs in Manitoba:

Large Tertiary EDs: Large tertiary EDs see more than 40,000 patients a year (100 - 150 patients a day) and have highly specialized ED care teams such as trauma teams, cardiac teams and on-site 24/7 diagnostic and laboratory services such as MRI and CT. St. Boniface Hospital and Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg are considered Manitoba’s tertiary EDs.

Community EDs: Community EDs see between 10,000 and 35,000 patients a year (28 to 79 patients a day). These EDs are generally located in larger urban areas, are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week and are mostly staffed by physicians with specialized ED training and a dedicated ED health care team.  Diagnostic and laboratory services may not be available 24/7 at these sites. Facilities such as Portage District General Hospital, Selkirk and District General Hospital, Boundary Trails Health Centre (between Winkler and Morden), Bethesda Regional Health Centre (Steinbach), Brandon Regional Health Centre, Dauphin Regional Health Centre, St. Anthony’s General Hospital (The Pas), Flin Flon General Hospital and Thompson General Hospital are examples of Community EDs.  

Small EDs: Small EDs open 24 hours a day, seven days a week are characterized as EDs that see between 5,000 and 10,000 patients a year (14 to 28 patients a day). Examples include Swan Valley Health Care (Swan River), Russell Health Centre, Johnson Memorial Hospital (Gimli) and Beausejour Hospital. These EDs are generally located in medium-sized rural communities, and are mostly staffed by family physicians who also maintain a primary care practice in the local community. The remainder of the ED team may or may not be dedicated to the ED, depending on patient volumes. 

Very small EDs: Very small EDs see less than 5,000 patients a year (2 to 14 patients a day). Examples of very small EDs include Centre médico-social De Salaberry District Health Centre (St. Pierre-Jolys), Carberry Plains Health Centre, Hunter Memorial  Hospital (Teulon) and Deloraine Health Centre, as well as many others across the province.  These EDs are generally located in small rural communities and may operate limited hours each day (e.g. 12 to 18 hours a day).  These EDs are mostly staffed by family physicians who also maintain a primary care practice in the local or nearby communities. Generally, one or two nurses provide care for all patients at the facility, including those who present to the ED. Due to the small volume of staff and patients at these facilities, these facilities tend to have higher risk of temporary closures or patient redirections without advanced notice.